Colleges

Triangle ADs: NCAA system not broken but could be fixed

Posted July 17, 2014

— The NCAA system may not be completely broken, but it could use some fixing was the general consensus among the athletic directors from the four major Triangle universities Thursday as they participated in a 90-minute, open forum discussion.

From education and cost of attendance to transfer rules to pay-for-play models, no question was off limits for University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s Bubba Cunningham, Duke University’s Dr. Kevin White, North Carolina State University’s Debbie Yow and North Carolina Central University’s Dr. Ingrid Wicker-McCree at a Fan Town Hall hosted by 99.9 The Fan ESPN Radio and simulcasted on WRAL-2 and WRALSportsFan.com.

“We used to be in the education business. For whatever reason we are now in the entertainment business,” said White.

One of the most discussed topics was the quality of education that student athletes are getting and whether or not athletics are being prioritized over education at establishments of higher learning.

“Athletics is not driving the admissions process,” Cunningham said. “We are looking at every process for student-athletes to ensure they are admitting students that can do the work. We do take risks, but we’ve seen it work successfully.”

“We identify at-risk student-athletes in the recruiting process,” said Yow. “We put them on a plan and take care of them… I don’t think anyone here would take somebody they didn’t think could do the work; who would take the opportunity.”

At NC Central, one of many historical black colleges and universities in the area, Wicker-McCree said she faces similar, but different, challenges.

“We have to be creative. We should look at dual enrollment programs to help the students get to where they need to be,” Wicker-McCree said, noting NCCU’s partnership with Durham Technical Community College.

Wicker-McCree and Yow each pointed out that often times, a student gets to college with a learning disability that has never been diagnosed and that the lower levels of education fail them early on.

White pointed to two current Olympic athletes at Duke that have each competed for their country and earned their way into medical school as an example of the system working if the student has the drive.

“It can happen for a student to get an education and be an athlete at a really high level,” he insisted.

Yow and Wicker-Mcree agreed with White’s sentiment, but noted that it boils down to choices.

“Nobody gets to do everything,” Yow said, comparing the schedule of a student-athlete to a common student with a full-time job. “Student-athletes have to make choices.”

Some of those choices, however, are made for the student-athletes. While White dismissed the notion of clustering among student-athlete majors in today’s system, Wicker-McCree pointed out the need to schedule practice time around classes, making the option of participation in a sport and concentration on a specific major increasingly difficult.

CAN THEY SELL WHAT’S THEIRS?

“We are making money, they are not,” said Yow.

It’s a simple statement that is the centerpiece of the national conversation when it comes to the NCAA.

It was argued Thursday that Johnny Manziel is currently profiting from the free marketing he got in college. But would he be who he is today without his offensive line and are those guys benefiting the same?

“It is bigger than any one athlete,” Wicker-McCree said. “It’s about fairness and equality within a team.”

One less-discussed option on the national level was posed by Yow: What if student athletes were able to make money on their likeness and jersey sales, but that money was placed into an escrow account for when they were no longer “amateurs” in the eyes of the NCAA?

Cunningham liked the idea but added, “All the funds in the account should go towards education where they can finish their degree at a later time if necessary.”

Of course a major problem is that it is the retailers and not the student-athletes or the schools that decide which jerseys get produced. As the panel pointed out, that can lead to team morale issues and a true imbalance in the experience.

So then, why can’t a student-athlete sell their own uniform after a season? Cunningham pointed out that that is a fundamental problem that needs to be examined.

“It’s a matter of borrowed versus earned,” Cunningham said. “It is given for use but not sale. The rule is there with the idea in mind, but it needs to be looked at.”

When it comes to pay-for-play models, all four AD’s agreed that the conversations are still too infantile to pinpoint a correct implementation.

White pointed out that a major difficulty lies in the fact that some Division I schools offer 17 sports while others offer 31 thus making the equities hard to calculate.

Yow added that the federal law doesn’t separate revenue versus non-revenue sports when it comes to student-athletes and that can further lead to balance issues.

Taking questions that ranged from cost of attendance to transfer rules to pay-for-play models, athletic directors from the four major Triangle universities agreed that the NCAA system may not be completely broken, but it could use some fixing.

“In the MEAC, we are trying to do more with less,” Wicker-McCree said. “Our schools are not making the millions of dollars but we are still trying to compete with the likes of Duke an others.”

When the conversation concluded, White, Wicker-McCree and Cunningham all agreed that the current NCAA system is the right idea but could use some tweaks. Only Yow said she would change the system.

"The fact is no two institutions are the same," White said.

31 Comments

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  • StunGunn Jul 18, 2:10 p.m.

    Kevin White hit the nail on the head when he said they are now in the entertainment business... View More

    — Posted by flyfish42

    Agree about White being accurate when he said schools were now in the "entertainment business", and I agree with you that this has to change. White also said it is possible for student/athletes to be very talented in their sport and also perform at a very high level in the classroom. That may be true, but I also believe that is the exception rather than the rule. There are more Julius Peppers than Shane Battiers in college athletics.

  • flyfish42 Jul 18, 12:08 p.m.

    Kevin White hit the nail on the head when he said they are now in the entertainment business rather than the education business. That has to change.

  • SaveEnergyMan Jul 18, 9:50 a.m.

    Debbie Yow's comments were the most insulting when she said it was about "opportunity" and that... View More

    — Posted by yo eleven

    Exactly. They are protecting their cash cow systems that let them operate professional minor league teams (in some cases with pro coach salaries) without the tax and union consequences of the NFL and NBA. The universities get exposure and some academic donations because of this, and all they have to do is to set aside slots for athletes to get in that couldn't otherwise and cover up their academic problems.

    Basketball and football are a business, plan and simple. Most of these athletes are not here for a degree, but for a tryout on a pro team. Because this is their ambition, they left academics behind years ago. The colleges then have to do everything they can to keep them legal - including cheat in the classroom - they all do it to some extent. It's about the money for everyone involved.

    The consumer wants high level college sports, but can't stomach how this is accomplished - kind of like making sausage.

  • pause to consider Jul 18, 9:48 a.m.

    "Wicker-McCree and Yow each pointed out that often times, a student gets to college with a learning disability that has never been diagnosed and that the lower levels of education fail them early on."

    The learning 'disability' is that even primary public education over looks teaching when athletic prowess is in the mix.

    Even some high school sports have become money makers (think Texas and Florida). I'd like to see the NCAA take the money out of college sports by capping maximum revenue that can be generated by any one school or sport. If a particular school has a great program or just a temporary star, the money is what takes the focus away from education.

    And, yes, the NCAA is broken.

  • heelsgirl05 Jul 18, 8:54 a.m.

    "One of the most discussed topics was the quality of education that student athletes are getting and whether or not athletics are being prioritized over education at establishments of higher learning."
    Wait a minute here....you mean to tell me that most of the big time college sport athletes who play 15-16 games a year in football and 35-40 in basketball aren't putting enough time aside to study for their pre-med, business, or any other time consuming, lots of workload major? Say it ain't so!! (insert sarcasm here)

  • aspenstreet1717 Jul 18, 8:46 a.m.

    Raise the minimum SAT score to play. Let the 'athletes' who have no business in College go pro if they can make it.

  • thomasew52 Jul 18, 8:27 a.m.

    The system is not broken according to them, b/c their big money jobs are at stake if these revenue producing sports were to be eliminated, and I think they should be.

  • TTSCP Jul 18, 12:54 a.m.

    "UNC had no issues with Julius Peppers until the scandal broke and we saw his transcript."

    Translation: ewenc had no issues until they got caught.

  • uBnice Jul 17, 11:23 p.m.

    With all due respect, VT has been doing the same thing for the entire time Beamer has been... View More

    — Posted by uBnice

    Michael didn't have any issues at VT. His deal was when he became an NFL player. His little bro... View More

    — Posted by vt94hokies

    No, Michael Vick was not qualified to be admitted to VT. The young man could barely speak... View More

    — Posted by uBnice

    Kinda like Peppers. Every word in his interviews were an uh. What? An uh. Vick is a dog figh... View More

    — Posted by vt94hokies

    I am not trying to cross swords with you. My point was that Michael Vick and Julius Peppers should never have been admitted to VT and UNC.

    I have a BA in mathematics, an MA in Mathematics, and a PhD in Statistics.

  • vt94hokies Jul 17, 11:05 p.m.

    "It's not about these athletes getting an education first." That's as dismal as any statement... View More

    — Posted by vt94hokies

    With all due respect, VT has been doing the same thing for the entire time Beamer has been... View More

    — Posted by uBnice

    Michael didn't have any issues at VT. His deal was when he became an NFL player. His little bro... View More

    — Posted by vt94hokies

    No, Michael Vick was not qualified to be admitted to VT. The young man could barely speak... View More

    — Posted by uBnice

    Kinda like Peppers. Every word in his interviews were an uh. What? An uh. Vick is a dog fighter and a dog killer. I detest him. How's this set with you? I don't regret obtaining a Doctorate from VT. Tell us about your high school diploma.

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